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Mic pattern question .

Discussion in 'Microphones (live or studio)' started by Smashh, Feb 25, 2020.

  1. Smashh

    Smashh Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2012
    Location:
    Australia
    A couple of weeks back we did a gig at our local jazz club . I took the lap top and put the AKG414
    equa distance between the 1 tom ,snare and kick . Probably 6 0r 7 inchs from each .
    The pattern was 360 on the mic . The result was great except for a pesky ride . It was a very dark ride ( no sustain)with too much clunk when hit constantly near the bell .

    Which led me to the question , Does the polar pattern on surround capture a globe shape / or is there
    some rejection immediately above/below the microphone ?. I assume there is some .
     
  2. kmetal

    kmetal Kyle P. Gushue Well-Known Member

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    Jul 21, 2009
    Location:
    Boston, Massachusetts
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    I am pretty sure it's a globe shape, but the frequency response varies a bit at different points of the globe. I could be mistaken. Either way i love omni! People overlook it, but it can be great on vocals. Also noteworthy is the proximity effect is minimized in omni which can be useful.
     
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  3. paulears

    paulears Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2014
    Location:
    Lowestoft - UK
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    The omni on multi-pattern mics is not a globe, because it uses the two capsules back to back combined, so the pickup pattern has some small dips and peaks, unlike a 'proper' pressure operated hemispherical response, BUT - it's rarely a problem. I think the issue here is simply proximity. 6 or 7 inches is quite close and proxmity effect means closest sources appear quite louder than more distant ones. Where was the ride in this setup? I've never found a random sensitivity on my 414s, so probably just an annoying ride cymbal with a loud but narrow peak, that makes a generally quiet hit sound loud.

    I rarely use omni for drums. For minimalist jazz, a Beyer M201 overhead works quite nicely aimed towards the snare/hat closest point, from cymbal height - just above drummers head height normally. It's hyper, so puts the metalwork in the nulls.
     
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  4. bouldersound

    bouldersound Real guitars are for old people. Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2010
    Location:
    Boulder, Colorado
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    Yeah, there's isn't rejection so much as a slightly imperfect globe-ish pattern. I'd be surprised if you could get away with one mic on the kit unless it actually sounds really balanced, and then the mic would have to be set at a little more of a distance. Maybe figure-8 pattern to pick up snare and tom, with a separate kick mic, would have been better. But of course there may have been limits on inputs or time etc.
     
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  5. Smashh

    Smashh Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2012
    Location:
    Australia
    You know , I cant exactly remember where the cymbal is in relation to the rest of the drums/mic.
    I will have to start documenting the set up by taking a picture at the time .
    Now I will quite likely do the same mistake , damn !
    There wasnt much time before starting gig , and I wanted to do a minimal set up .
    Even so , I wanted as good a job as i could do .
    Ahaa , I will have to check out some photos from the gig . That may help .

     

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  6. dvdhawk

    dvdhawk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2008
    Location:
    Western Pennsylvania, USA
    Just to clarify; the term "proximity effect" kmetal is referring to is a characteristic of virtually all directional mics. The closer they are to the source, the more they emphasize the low-mid and bass frequencies. Omnis are much more accurate and neutral in that regard. The paulears definition is one of "proximity" = distance, and the perceived loudness of multiple sources.
     
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  7. bouldersound

    bouldersound Real guitars are for old people. Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2010
    Location:
    Boulder, Colorado
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    Electro-Voice "Variable-D" mikes (RE20, RE15 etc.) are exceptions to the directional mic proximity effect rule.
     
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  8. dvdhawk

    dvdhawk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2008
    Location:
    Western Pennsylvania, USA
    True. I was just trying to clear up some terminology.

    I have a number of the E-V mics plus several AKG D series mics that are exceptions too. (and the reason I threw in the qualifier, "virtually")
    The AKG D3600 is a dual-capsule dynamic, cardioid instrument mic. The rear capsule's sole purpose is cancelling out the proximity effect. They're a bit weird looking, but really useful for a variety of instruments.

    I have always preferred the AKG D3600 to an SM57, especially on a guitar amp. You can position it right against the grill and capture the actual tone of the amp - without the annoying bass boost. I never understood why some guitar players will obsess endlessly about their tone and then jam a 57 into the grill.
     
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