Budget monitors for the meantime

Discussion in 'Monitoring' started by kmetal, Jul 20, 2016.

  • AT5047

    The New AT5047 Premier Studio Microphone Purity Transformed

  1. kmetal

    kmetal Kyle P. Gushue Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2009
    Location:
    Boston, Massachusetts
    Home Page:
    What I've found isn't more expensive mics and monitors are far more sensitive to the environment, where the lesser expensive gears inherent limitations naturally ignore some of the flaws.

    I was very disappointed in my mixes when I first got my mackie HRs which are on the lower side, and suprisingly dissapointed in my 414.

    It wasn't the gear, it was the room and my technique. It took about 6mo for me to adjust to the speakers and a month or so about the mic, along w some bad trapping and RFZ treatment.

    A pair of low cost monitors that are alluring to me are the Alesis monitor one Mk3 for $200 a pair.

    To be honest what I've found is that in all but the best room I've worked in, which was modified by some bright minds who have forgotten more than I'll ever know, that the sound in the control room doesn't really have much bearing on what it sounds like on regular audio systems, phones, ect.

    Balances between things move relatively easily, but EQ and Timbre are essentially a crap shoot.

    While by no means HIFI or great, I found my older mixes I did on standard stereo equipment move around better than most of my others. They lack detail, but all around they seem to show fewer anomalies.
     
  2. DonnyThompson

    DonnyThompson Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2012
    Location:
    Akron/Cleveland, OH
    Home Page:
    well, that's one of the things that makes those "best" rooms the best. Translation is important, knowing that whatever you mix there is going to sound great anywhere else you play it... that's an important thing, and inspires confidence in mixing.

    The thing is, these days, since every one and their dog now has a "studio", you can't count on those rooms to travel mixes well. Basement and attic rooms, where the owner throws up a couple tiles of Auralex ( or carpet, or whatever) are generally not places you can trust to turn out mixes that translate well. I'm not saying it's impossible, there are probably a few home studios out there that do have good acoustics, merely by the luck of the draw, the ball takes a funny bounce and a room sounds good....But I don't believe that this is the "general" rule of thumb.

    Personally speaking, I think people building home studios put more stock and trust into big dollar monitors, hoping that they will be the silver bullet to great mixes in less than good sounding rooms, when it's really more about the room in which those monitors occupy.
    If given the choice, I'd rather mix through an old pair of passive M1's in a well treated and accurate room, than I would mix through $4000 Genelecs in a small, untreated space.

    Just my opinion, of course.
     
    kmetal likes this.
  3. kmetal

    kmetal Kyle P. Gushue Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2009
    Location:
    Boston, Massachusetts
    Home Page:
    Well put D.

    That's why I've been floating this theory around for all these years. Studio monitors have studios in mind, regular speakers have regular rooms in mind.

    I'd be beyond my area of expertise to comment too much on speaker design, but i would imagine home stereo speakers designers are keeping the typical anomalies of typical rooms in mind. A common size room / furnished room is gonna have a decent amount of slap echo, and main modal issue in the 70-100hz range.

    I understand there's different goals in mind, and maybe the stereo speakers would even expand on that mode issue for more enhanced bass. But to me the home speaker systems are expecting untreated residential size rooms, where the studio speakers, even aimed at home use, expecting a treated/flat room.

    Again it's just a theory, and really me trying to figure out why those old mixes translated well, even tho I was a novice at home (untreated) on a soundblaster and home stereo.

    For the record I did try my best to match my reference songs, but still.

    Ya know D, 'mixing to the room/speakers' over at the good studio really really changed my mixdown experience, and perspective. I always knew acoustics were important and why, but to experience it, was a real life changer. Lol no 'mental mix' compensation for the room, which is something I've always had to do elsewhere.

    I'd trade all the fancy analog and cool mics for a room and system that translates.
     
  4. kmetal

    kmetal Kyle P. Gushue Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2009
    Location:
    Boston, Massachusetts
    Home Page:
    Lol maybe it's time I revisit those mixes to make sure my memory is accurate.
     
  5. Davedog

    Davedog Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2001
    Location:
    Pacific NW
    MY dog doesn't have a 'studio' of her own per se, but she will hang out in the one provided for her by the 'management' at her hotel.......

    The one thing I find that stands out to me in the home studio rooms I've been in, is the owner/engineers/producers don't use the stuff they do have to it's full potential. It's like their technique never got past a certain point and then they added money to it only to turn out similar quality results.

    However....I will take a pair of $4000 Genelecs in ANY room any time over a whole bunch of "other' monitors.
     
    kmetal and DonnyThompson like this.
  6. DonnyThompson

    DonnyThompson Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2012
    Location:
    Akron/Cleveland, OH
    Home Page:
    My dog has a studio. She just lets me use it. ;)
     

    Attached Files:

    kmetal likes this.
  7. kmetal

    kmetal Kyle P. Gushue Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2009
    Location:
    Boston, Massachusetts
    Home Page:
    I learned more in a year at the commercial studios than 5 years on my own. So I agree very much w your statement about technique ect.

    I also found having someone else mix my recordings to be eye opening, and both a positive and negative learning experience. But I learned, nonetheless.

    It's also interesting when everyone's using the same room and gear, you see the difference in technique. This can show you that yeah, not even long time / successful engineers can turn mid level gear and bands into much more than that, and that an ametuer can screw up a recording with the best gear out there.


    The best thing however, is once you hear your stuff in a room that translates, you get a much better idea of what you are or aren't hearining in other spaces, that may be more compromised. This can cause significant improvements all around.

    I wouldn't go as far as some engineers would with this concept, but their is truth to the notion that a good engineer can make 'a record' with a few sm 57's and a good band and song.
     
  • AT5047

    The New AT5047 Premier Studio Microphone Purity Transformed

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice